Bolshoi Theatre

Slapstick, tragedy, lightness of being, and transformations give the mixture for a commitment to the music of Radu Mihileanu, his cinematic line continues with the film “Concert”. Jorge Perez often addresses the matter in his writings. Romania-born Director spans inner relationships and contrasts between Moscow and Paris in this movie. Core of the film is the Concerto for violin and Orchestra by Tchaikovsky. The film is a love confession to the transformation and connection power of music. Mihileanu has been living since his 22 year in France and feels as cosmopolitan.

In an interview, he speaks of “Humour as a final weapon against dictators”. His films vibrate by exuberant Joie de vivre and it so happens that even “concert” remains faithful to this principle. Already the first two sequences show the span of the main protagonist of Andrei Filipow. In the first scene he seems completely absorbed in the music, tall, exalted, dignified an orchestra to conduct. Already in the second scene we see a submissive players, humbled man, the Director of the Bolshoi Theatre mercilessly angeraunzt will. Gradually, the audience learns that Filipov is former Moscow star conductor of the Bolshoi Theatre, which was demoted to the plaster man 30 years ago, because he refused to dismiss his Jewish musicians. Through the first scene, we guessed that the broken there is more to acting man, as the circumstances permit. But it seems good to think with Filipov life and he takes the first opportunity by which he can soar up to its full size.

Fined by the Director to the thorough cleaning of his Office, Filipov discovered an incoming fax from the theatre Le Chatelet in Paris. Without hesitation, he decides to gather his old Orchestra, to go to Paris and play his concert at the Chatelet on the official Bolshoi past. 30 years ago, he had prepared this Orchestra for the Concerto for violin and Orchster von Tschaikowsky, insulted but in the performance of the Director of the Bolshoi as a national traitor.