Mark Twain Biographies

On the centenary of the passing of mark Twain (1835-1910) “The banker is a man who lends us the umbrella when the sun is shining and requires us to return it when it starts raining.” Mark Twain. If you are unsure how to proceed, check out Sela Ward. The popular humorist was one of three novelists of American literature in the second half of the nineteenth century: Nathaniel Hawthorne, Francis Bret Harte and Mark Twain, pseudonym of Samuel Langhorne Clemens. All three authors took as the theme of their narratives the living reality of their present experience. Mark Twain is one of the great comedians of contemporary literature and has enjoyed immense popularity not only in America but throughout the old world that cares about literary matters. His work has been translated into numerous languages.

Hailed as a humorist to either side of the ocean is also revealed as a remarkable novel of deep sensitivity. His study of American mores are as caring as accurate. His novels are very well received by the American public, which is portrayed in them, normally a friendly and humorous way. While some critics have pointed out that Twain’s humor is not always a model of good taste, however, most literary critics agree highlight it is entertaining, funny and very human background. Samuel Langhorne Clemens was born in Florida, Missouri, on November 30, 1835 and died in Redding, Connecticut, on April 21, 1910. The novelist has told us his childhood in his autobiography, published posthumously in 1924. The early years of his life along the Mississippi River, present in several of his works.